Tuesday, 9 April 2013

Everything on Asbestos Exposure

  
Asbestos has been used in many industries. For example, the building and construction industries have used it for strengthening cement and plastics as well as for insulation, roofing, fireproofing, and sound absorption. The shipbuilding industry has used asbestos to insulate boilers, steam pipes, and hot water pipes. The automotive industry uses asbestos in vehicle brake shoes and clutch pads. Asbestos has also been used in ceiling and floor tiles; paints, coatings, and adhesives; and plastics.     
     People may be exposed to asbestos in their workplace, their communities, or their homes. If products containing asbestos are disturbed, tiny asbestos fibers are released into the air. When asbestos fibers are breathed in, they may get trapped in the lungs and remain there for a long time. Over time, these fibers can accumulate and cause scarring and inflammation, which can affect breathing and lead to serious health problems. Everyone is exposed to asbestos at some time during their life. Low levels of asbestos are present in the air, water, and soil. However, most people do not become ill from their exposure. People who become ill from asbestos are usually those who are exposed to it on a regular basis, most often in a job where they work directly with the material or through substantial environmental contact.
      Asbestos has been classified as a known human carcinogen (a substance that causes cancer) by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the EPA, and the International Agency for Research on Cancer. Studies have shown that exposure to asbestos may increase the risk of lung cancer and mesothelioma. Individuals who have been exposed (or suspect they have been exposed) to asbestos fibers on the job, through the environment, or at home via should inform their doctor about their exposure history and whether or not they experience any symptoms. For full article and supporting links please follow http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/factsheet/Risk/asbestos 

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1 comment:

  1. Great post! Contractors need to have more stringent regulations when removing asbestos. Careless mistakes such as failing to remove asbestos properties put peoples lives at risk and should be avoided at all costs. Conducting proper asbestos surveys play a key part in greatly diminishing future issues.

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